William A. Catterall

Professor & Chair, Department of Pharmacology at University of Washington - School of Medicine

William A. Catterall

William A. Catterall

Professor & Chair, Department of Pharmacology at University of Washington - School of Medicine

Biography

William A. Catterall PhD
Recipient of the Canada Gairdner International Award, 2010
Department of Pharmacology, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington, USA

A native of Rhode Island, Dr. William A. Catterall received his BA degree in Chemistry from Brown University in 1968, his PhD in Physiological Chemistry from Johns Hopkins School of Medicine in 1972, and his postdoctoral training in neurobiology and molecular pharmacology as a Muscular Dystrophy Association Research Fellow with Dr. Marshall Nirenberg at the National Institutes of Health from 1972 to 1974. Following three more years as a staff scientist at the National Institutes of Health, he joined the faculty of the University of Washington School of Medicine in 1977 as an associate professor in the Department of Pharmacology, became professor in 1981, and Chair of the Department of Pharmacology in 1984.

After establishing his laboratory at the University of Washington, Dr. Catterall and his colleagues discovered the voltage-gated sodium and calcium channel proteins, which are responsible for generation of electrical signals in the brain, heart, skeletal muscles, and other excitable cells. Their subsequent work has contributed much to understanding the structure, function, regulation, and molecular pharmacology of these key cell-signaling molecules. Dr. Catterall's recent work has turned toward understanding diseases caused by impaired function and regulation of voltage-gated ion channels, including epilepsy and periodic paralysis.

Dr. Catterall's early research was recognized with the Passano Foundation Young Scientist Award in 1981 and with Jacob Javits Neuroscience Investigator Awards in 1984 and 1991. Dr. Catterall received the Basic Science Prize of the American Heart Association in 1992, the Mathilde Solowey Award in Neuroscience from the National Institutes of Health and the H.B. Van Dyke Award in Pharmacology from Columbia University in 1995, the McKnight Foundation Senior Neuroscience Investigator Award in 1998, and the Bristol-Myers Squibb Award for Distinguished Achievement in Neuroscience Research in 2003.

Dr. Catterall was elected to the National Academy of Sciences in 1989, where he served as Chair of the Section of Physiology & Pharmacology from 1998 to 2001. He was elected to the Institute of Medicine and the American Academy of Arts & Sciences in 2000, and he was elected as a Foreign Member of the Royal Society of London in 2008. He served as editor-in-chief of Molecular Pharmacology from 1985 to 1990, was a founding member of the editorial board of Neuron in 1988, and has been an editorial board member of numerous other professional journals. Dr. Catterall and his colleagues have published more than 400 research papers and 30 reviews and reference works on voltage-gated ion channels.

Overview
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Venture Advisor at 5AM Venture Management LLC

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Co-Founder at Genetics Institute LLC

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Director at Sloan-Kettering Institute For Cancer Research

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Founder at Agios Pharmaceuticals, Inc.

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Chairman-Molecular Biology Department at The University of Texas - Southwestern Medical Center

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President & Chief Executive Officer at Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory

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Former Scientific Director at National Institute of Neurological Disorders & Stroke

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Professor & Chairman-Molecular Genetics Department at The University of Texas - Southwestern Medical Center

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Co-Director at Columbia University - Center for Theoretical Neuroscience

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Co-Founder at Omniox, Inc.

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William A. Catterall
Professor & Chair, Department of Pharmacology at University of Washington - School of Medicine
Education
PhD in Physiological Chemistry
Class of 1972

The Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine (JHUSOM), located in Baltimore, Maryland, U.S., is the academic medical teaching and research arm of Johns Hopkins University. Johns Hopkins has consistently been among the nation's top medical schools in the number of research grants awarded by the National Institutes of Health.

BA Degree in Chemistry
Class of 1968

Brown University is located in historic Providence, Rhode Island and was founded in 1764. It is the seventh-oldest college in the United States. Brown is an independent, coeducational Ivy League institution comprising undergraduate and graduate programs, plus the Alpert Medical School, School of Public Health, School of Engineering, and the School of Professional Studies.

Memberships
Foreign Member
2008 - Current
Member
2000 - Current

Founded in 1780, the American Academy of Arts and Sciences is an independent policy research center that conducts multidisciplinary studies of complex and emerging problems. The Academy’s elected members are leaders in the academic disciplines, the arts, business, and public affairs. With a current membership of 4,000 American Fellows and 600 Foreign Honorary Members, the Academy has four major goals: Promoting service and study through analysis of critical social and intellectual issues and the development of practical policy alternatives; Fostering public engagement and the exchange of ideas with meetings, conferences, and symposia bringing diverse perspectives to the examination of issues of common concern; Mentoring a new generation of scholars and thinkers through the Visiting Scholars Program and Hellman Fellowship Program; Honoring excellence by electing to membership men and women in a broad range of disciplines and professions. Click here to learn about our new members. The Academy's headquarters are in Cambridge, Massachusetts. With its geographically diverse membership, it conducts activities in this country and abroad

Member
2000 - Current

The National Academy of Medicine (NAM), formerly called the Institute of Medicine (IoM), is an American nonprofit, non-governmental organization. The National Academy of Medicine is a part of the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine, along with the National Academy of Sciences (NAS), National Academy of Engineering (NAE), and the National Research Council (NRC). The National Academy of Medicine provides national advice on issues relating to biomedical science, medicine, and health, and serves as an adviser to the nation to improve health. It aims to provide unbiased, evidence-based, and authoritative information and advice concerning health and science policy to policy-makers, professionals, leaders in every sector of society, and the public at large. Operating outside the framework of the U.S. federal government, it relies on a volunteer workforce of scientists and other experts, operating under a formal peer-review system. As a national academy, new members of the organization are elected annually by current members, based on their distinguished and continuing achievements in a relevant field as well as for their willingness to participate actively.

Career History
Professor & Chair, Department of Pharmacology
1977 - Current

The University of Washington School of Medicine (UWSOM) is a public medical school in the northwest United States, located in Seattle and affiliated with the University of Washington.

Staff Scientist
Prior

NIH is the largest source of funding for medical research in the world, creating hundreds of thousands of high-quality jobs by funding thousands of scientists in universities and research institutions in every state across America and around the globe. NIH is made up of 27 Institutes and Centers, each with a specific research agenda, often focusing on particular diseases or body systems. NIH leadership plays an active role in shaping the agency's research planning, activities, and outlook. The Office of the Director is the central office at NIH, responsible for setting policy for NIH and for planning, managing, and coordinating the programs and activities of all the NIH components. The NIH Director, with a unique and critical perspective on the entire agency, is responsible for providing leadership to the Institutes and for constantly identifying needs and opportunities, especially for efforts that involve multiple Institutes. The NIH Director is assisted by the NIH Deputy Directors including the Principal Deputy Director, who shares in the overall direction of the agency's activities. NIH is responsive to Congressional legislation that adjusts NIH's programs to meet changing research needs. As a result of the NIH reauthorization process, NIH is able to respond strategically in an era when medical research requires constant innovation and increased interdisciplinary efforts. More than 80% of the NIH's budget goes to more than 300,000 research personnel at over 2,500 universities and research institutions. In addition, about 6,000 scientists work in NIH’s own Intramural Research laboratories, most of which are on the NIH main campus in Bethesda, Maryland. The main campus is also home to the NIH Clinical Center, the largest hospital in the world totally dedicated to clinical research. Successful biomedical research depends on the talent and dedication of the scientific workforce. NIH supports many innovative training programs and funding mechanisms that foster scientific creativity and exploration. The goal is to strengthen our nation’s research capacity, broaden our research base, and inspire a passion for science in current and future generations of researchers. NIH encourages and depends on public involvement in federally supported research and activities. NIH’s wide-ranging public efforts include outreach and education, nationwide events, requests for public input on NIH projects, and special programs designed specifically to involve public representatives in clinical research

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