Susan Billington Harper

Nonresident Scholar at Carnegie Endowment for International Peace

Susan Billington Harper

Susan Billington Harper

Nonresident Scholar at Carnegie Endowment for International Peace

Biography

Susan Harper is a nonresident scholar at the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace.

Harper was previously senior officer at The Pew Charitable Trusts, executive director of the Templeton Prize for Progress in Religion, and lecturer in History, Literature, and Expository Writing at Harvard University. She has served on the boards of the Association of American Rhodes Scholars, Eastern University, and Capital for Good Impact.

Harper’s areas of expertise include the history of cultural and religious interactions in South Asia and the Middle East, Progressive-era internationalism, and the writing of historical biography. She is working on a history of American humanitarianism in the Middle East.

*
January 26, 2016 Sarasota, Florida

Genocide and American Humanitarianism: Lessons From World War I and Its Aftermath

Susan Harper will discuss the role that the genocide in Armenia played in setting the precedent than has affected American response to genocide in all conflicts since World War I.

*
May 7, 2015 Washington, DC Video

American Humanitarianism in the Armenian Crucible: 1915-1923

Susan B. Harper delivered the 19th Annual Vardanants Day Armenian Lecture featuring historical photographs from the Library's collection as well as those of other institutions.

Overview
RelSci Relationships

220

Relationships
RelSci Relationships are individuals Susan Billington Harper likely has professional access to. A relationship does not necessarily indicate a personal connection.

President at Vision-Five

Relationship likelihood: Strong

Nonresident Senior Associate Nuclear Policy Program at Carnegie Endowment for International Peace

Relationship likelihood: Weak

Nonresident Senior Associate Nuclear Policy Program at Carnegie Endowment for International Peace

Relationship likelihood: Weak

Professor, Political Economy of Multinational Enterprises at Texas A&M University - Bush School of Government and Public Service

Relationship likelihood: Weak

Nonresident Associate Carnegie Europe at Carnegie Endowment for International Peace

Relationship likelihood: Weak

Nonresident Associate Carnegie Europe at Carnegie Endowment for International Peace

Relationship likelihood: Weak

Visiting Fellow at Carnegie Endowment for International Peace

Relationship likelihood: Weak

Audio Visual Engineer at Carnegie Endowment for International Peace

Relationship likelihood: Weak

Visiting Scholar Middle East Program at Carnegie Endowment for International Peace

Relationship likelihood: Weak

Visiting Scholar Geoeconomics & Strategy Program at Carnegie Endowment for International Peace

Relationship likelihood: Weak

In The News
Paths to Susan Billington Harper
Potential Connections via
Relationship Science
You
Susan Billington Harper
Nonresident Scholar at Carnegie Endowment for International Peace
Family Members
Spouse
Parent, Deceased
Former Librarian at The Library of Congress

The Library of Congress was established by an act of Congress in 1800 when President John Adams signed a bill providing for the transfer of the seat of government from Philadelphia to the new capital city of Washington. The legislation described a reference library for Congress only, containing "such books as may be necessary for the use of Congress - and for putting up a suitable apartment for containing them therein…" Established with $5,000 appropriated by the legislation, the original library was housed in the new Capitol until August 1814, when invading British troops set fire to the Capitol Building, burning and pillaging the contents of the small library. Within a month, retired President Thomas Jefferson offered his personal library as a replacement. Jefferson had spent 50 years accumulating books, "putting by everything which related to America, and indeed whatever was rare and valuable in every science"; his library was considered to be one of the finest in the United States. In offering his collection to Congress, Jefferson anticipated controversy over the nature of his collection, which included books in foreign languages and volumes of philosophy, science, literature, and other topics not normally viewed as part of a legislative library. He wrote, "I do not know that it contains any branch of science which Congress would wish to exclude from their collection; there is, in fact, no subject to which a Member of Congress may not have occasion to refer." In January 1815, Congress accepted Jefferson's offer, appropriating $23,950 for his 6,487 books, and the foundation was laid for a great national library. The Jeffersonian concept of universality, the belief that all subjects are important to the library of the American legislature, is the philosophy and rationale behind the comprehensive collecting policies of today's Library of Congress. Ainsworth Rand Spofford, Librarian of Congress from 1864 to 1897, applied Jefferson's philosophy on a grand scale and built the Library into a national institution. Spofford was responsible for the copyright law of 1870, which required all copyright applicants to send to the Library two copies of their work. This resulted in a flood of books, pamphlets, maps, music, prints, and photographs. Facing a shortage of shelf space at the Capitol, Spofford convinced Congress of the need for a new building, and in 1873 Congress authorized a competition to design plans for the new Library. In 1886, after many proposals and much controversy, Congress authorized construction of a new Library building in the style of the Italian Renaissance in accordance with a design prepared by Washington architects John L. Smithmeyer and Paul J. Pelz. The Congressional authorization was successful because of the hard work of two key Senators: Daniel W. Voorhees (Indiana), who served as chairman of the Joint Committee from 1879 to 1881, and Justin S. Morrill (Vermont), chairman of Senate Committee on Buildings and Grounds. In 1888, General Thomas Lincoln Casey, chief of the Army Corps of Engineers, was placed in charge of construction. His chief assistant was Bernard R. Green, who was intimately involved with the building until his death in 1914. Beginning in 1892, a new architect, Edward Pearce Casey, the son of General Casey, began to supervise the interior work, including sculptural and painted decoration by more than 50 American artists. When the Library of Congress building opened its doors to the public on November 1, 1897, it was hailed as a glorious national monument and "the largest, the costliest, and the safest" library building in the world.

Career History
Nonresident Scholar
Current

The Carnegie Endowment for International Peace is a foreign-policy think tank with centers in Washington, D.C., Moscow, Beirut, Beijing, and Brussels. The organization describes itself as being dedicated to advancing cooperation between nations and promoting active international engagement by the United States. Founded in 1910 by Andrew Carnegie, its work is not formally associated with any political party.

Other Affiliations

Susan Billington Harper is affiliated with Carnegie Endowment for International Peace

This web site is not endorsed by, directly affiliated with, maintained, authorized, or sponsored by Susan Billington Harper. The use of any trade name or trademark is for identification and reference purposes only and does not imply any association with the trademark holder. The Presence of Susan Billington Harper's profile does not indicate a business or promotional relationship of any kind between RelSci and Susan Billington Harper.