Peter Devreotes

Director of the Department of Cell Biology at Johns Hopkins University - School of Medicine

Peter Devreotes

Peter Devreotes

Director of the Department of Cell Biology at Johns Hopkins University - School of Medicine

Biography

Peter Devreotes is Isaac Morris and Lucille Elizabeth Hay Professor and Director of the Department of Cell Biology at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine. He received his Ph.D. in Biophysics from Johns Hopkins University. After completing a postdoctoral fellowship at the University of Chicago, he joined the Department of Biological Chemistry at Johns Hopkins. From 1990 to 2000, he served as Director of the Biochemistry, Cellular and Molecular Biology Graduate Program. In 2000, he became Director of the Department of Cell Biology. Devreotes' research focuses on understanding how cells sense their surroundings and move towards chemical stimuli. Chemotaxis is critical for morphogenesis in development, immune cell trafficking, stem cell homing and wound healing, and it is exploited in disease states such as cancer metastasis. Devreotes was the first to identify chemoattractant receptors and to demonstrate that signaling events occur selectively at the cell’s leading edge, studies that have led to the most definite understanding of the strategy that cells use to sense direction. A recognized international leader in his field, Devreotes is a member of the National Academy of Sciences. He has served on the Council of the American Society for Cell Biology, the Advisory Boards of the Cell Migration Consortium, and the Searle Scholar Program. He has presented over 400 invited lectures, including plenary or keynote lectures at major international conferences. He founded the Gordon Conference on "Gradient Sensing and Directed Cell Migration." He is the author of more than 230 research articles, reviews and book chapters, and has trained over 60 pre- and postdoctoral fellows.

Overview
RelSci Relationships

1271

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4

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Sterling Professor of Molecular, Cellular & Developmental Biology at Yale University - Yale School of Medicine

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Non-Resident Fellow at The Salk Institute for Biological Studies

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Professor at The California Council on Science & Technology

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Neurosurgeon-in-Chief at Johns Hopkins University - School of Medicine

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Chair, Department of Cell Biology at The University of Texas - Southwestern Medical Center

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Director, Head & Neck Cancer Research Division at Johns Hopkins University

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Director, Department of Pharmacology & Molecular Sciences at Johns Hopkins University - School of Medicine

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Director-Imaging Science at Johns Hopkins University

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Member, Editorial Board at Cancer Cell

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Executive Director, Cell Science at Allen Institute

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Peter Devreotes
Director of the Department of Cell Biology at Johns Hopkins University - School of Medicine
Education
Ph.D. in Biophysics

The Johns Hopkins University opened in 1876, with the inauguration of its first president, Daniel Coit Gilman. "What are we aiming at?" Gilman asked in his installation address. "The encouragement of research ... and the advancement of individual scholars, who by their excellence will advance the sciences they pursue, and the society where they dwell." The mission laid out by Gilman remains the university's mission today, summed up in a simple but powerful restatement of Gilman's own words: "Knowledge for the world." What Gilman created was a research university, dedicated to advancing both students' knowledge and the state of human knowledge through research and scholarship. Gilman believed that teaching and research are interdependent, that success in one depends on success in the other. A modern university, he believed, must do both well. The realization of Gilman's philosophy at Johns Hopkins, and at other institutions that later attracted Johns Hopkins-trained scholars, revolutionized higher education in America, leading to the research university system as it exists today. After more than 130 years, Johns Hopkins remains a world leader in both teaching and research. Eminent professors mentor top students in the arts and music, the humanities, the social and natural sciences, engineering, international studies, education, business and the health professions. Those same faculty members, and their research colleagues at the university's Applied Physics Laboratory, have each year since 1979 won Johns Hopkins more federal research and development funding than any other university. The university has nine academic divisions and campuses throughout the Baltimore-Washington area. The Krieger School of Arts and Sciences, the Whiting School of Engineering, the School of Education and the Carey Business School are based at the Homewood campus in northern Baltimore. The schools of Medicine, Public Health, and Nursing share a campus in east Baltimore with The Johns Hopkins Hospital. The Peabody Institute, a leading professional school of music, is located on Mount Vernon Place in downtown Baltimore. The Paul H. Nitze School of Advanced International Studies is located in Washington's Dupont Circle area. The Applied Physics Laboratory is a division of the university co-equal to the nine schools, but with a non-academic, research-based mission. APL, located between Baltimore and Washington, supports national security and also pursues space science, exploration of the Solar System and other civilian research and development. Johns Hopkins also has a campus near Rockville in Montgomery County, Md., and has academic facilities in Nanjing, China, and in Bologna, Italy. It maintains a network of continuing education facilities throughout the Baltimore-Washington region, including centers in downtown Baltimore, in downtown Washington and in Columbia. When considered in partnership with its sister institution, the Johns Hopkins Hospital and Health System, the university is Maryland's largest employer and contributes more than $10 billion a year to the state's economy

Memberships
Member
Current

The National Academy of Sciences (NAS) formed the Committee on International Security and Arms Control (CISAC) in 1980 as a permanent committee to bring the resources of the Academy to bear on critical problems of international security and arms control. CISAC, in the Policy and Global Affairs Division, draws from the nation’s finest scientific, technical, engineering and medical talent to advise the government, contribute to the work of non-governmental organizations, and inform the public about scientific and technical issues related to international security and arms control. CISAC’s work benefits from a rotating membership of distinguished scientists, policy and military experts. The Committee carries out its mandate through a variety of activities that receive financial support from public and private sponsors.

Career History
Director of the Department of Cell Biology
Current

The Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine (JHUSOM), located in Baltimore, Maryland, U.S., is the academic medical teaching and research arm of Johns Hopkins University. Johns Hopkins has consistently been among the nation's top medical schools in the number of research grants awarded by the National Institutes of Health.

Postdoctoral Fellowship
Prior

The University of Chicago's Office of Investments (COI) is responsible for managing the University's investment assets, which includes overseeing the endowment to ensure that it benefits both current and future generations of the University of Chicago. COI oversees the broad investment strategy and provides input to the development of the strategic and tactical investment policies of the University & UCMC endowments, pension plans and self-insurance trust assets. Their strategy combines qualitative and quantitative analysis, seeking to achieve superior investment performance on a risk-adjusted basis.COI's approach seeks to evaluate the investment strategy as an integrated part of the operating plans of the University rather than in isolation and focuses the the University's overall success, not investment returns. The endowment is well-diversified across a variety of asset classes, including global stocks and bonds, real estate, natural resources, private equity, absolute return strategies and protection (tail-hedging strategies). Asset class exposure is achieved primarily by selecting and engaging external managers. COI manages the global macro and the overlay portfolio to ensure that the portfolio's overall positioning is compliance with the endowment's investment guidelines.COI's strategies for investing in the public markets include: Absolute Return, Private Debt, Fixed Income and Credit. and Global Equities.COI's real assets team invests globally in real estate and natural resources using outside managers. The real estate portfolio invests globally in value-added and opportunistic strategies using both private partnerships and public vehicles. The natural resources portfolio invests globally in strategies that include, but are not limited to: oil and gas exploration & production; power generation; infrastructure; timber; mining and minerals; and agriculture.

Boards & Committees
Member, Cell Science Scientific Advisory Board
Current

The Allen Institute is dedicated to answering some of the biggest questions in bioscience and accelerating research worldwide. The Institute is a recognized leader in large-scale research with a commitment to an open science model within its research institutes, the Allen Institute for Brain Science, and the Allen Institute for Cell Science.

Other Affiliations
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