Kenneth LaValle

State Senator from the 1st District at New York State Senate

Kenneth LaValle

Kenneth LaValle

State Senator from the 1st District at New York State Senate

Biography

Kenneth P. LaValle, (R-C-I, Port Jefferson) was first elected to the New York State Senate in 1976 and was appointed Chairman of the Senate Committee on Higher Education in 1979. Senator LaValle has helped shape higher education policy in New York State for more than 30 years where his work with education leaders at the State University of New York, City University of New York and independent colleges has earned him the respect of the academic community.In 2007, the Governor appointed Senator LaValle to the New York State Commission on Higher Education which was charged with identifying ways of improving the quality of higher education in the State. Senator LaValle also served on the National Council of State Legislatures’ Blue Ribbon Commission on Higher Education whose goal was to create awareness among State Legislatures of their role in providing accessible and affordable public higher education. Senator LaValle's achievements in education and higher education are matched by a distinguished record in health care and he is most proud of his work in establishing a Burn Unit at Stony Brook University Medical Center. His legislation to protect and advance the rights of patients earned him special recognition from the Suffolk County Breast Health Partnership. St. Charles Hospice also paid tribute to his efforts in developing a program for terminally ill patients in nursing homes. His commitment to quality health care is continued in his efforts to create an east end hospital alliance, ensuring continued access to vital health services on eastern Long Island. Senator LaValle was instrumental in creating The Long Island High Technology Incubator at Stony Brook University and championed the Stony Brook University Incubator at Calverton. The Calverton Incubator was conceived as an economic engine to enhance Eastern Long Island's agricultural, aquacultural and environmental industries. The Long Island High Technology Incubator is a non-profit organization dedicated to helping new technologically-innovative companies to grow by providing them with a variety of support resources and services. Since opening in 1992, the Incubator has been associated with more than 70 businesses, and 44 companies have graduated successfully from the LIHTI program, contributing more than $2.5B to the national economy and creating jobs for more than 500 employees. Senator LaValle's environmental legacy is reflected in the enactment of the Pine Barrens Preservation Act of 1993. As the author of this historic legislation, he has assured the protection of environmentally-sensitive lands for generations to come and is often cited as a landmark initiative in the environmental well-being of Long Island. The Long Island Pine Barrens Society, the Group for the South Fork, the North Fork Environmental Council, the Peconic Land Trust, and the Nature Conservancy are but a few of the many organizations from which Senator LaValle has received praise for his positive contributions on environmental issues. Throughout his tenure in the New York State Senate, real property tax relief has been an important priority for Senator LaValle. As a major architect in the development of the STAR program, he takes tremendous personal satisfaction in the benefits this initiative has brought to homeowners in the First Senatorial District. Senator LaValle has also been a formidable advocate for the disabled. He was responsible for drafting much of the existing legislation providing disabled citizens with greater access to educational opportunities and continues to champion issues important to senior citizens. Senator LaValle has also advanced bills critical to local firefighters and veterans' organizations. In recognition of his outstanding dedication to the people of New York State, Senator LaValle has been repeatedly named "Man of the Year" and "Legislator of the Year" by diverse groups of local and statewide organizations. He was also presented the Medallion of the University from the State University of New York at Albany and the University Medal from Stony Brook University in tribute to his work in higher education. Both awards are the highest honor accorded by the universities. Extremely proud of his Italian heritage, Senator LaValle was privileged to receive the honorary title "Cavaliere al Merito della Repubblica Italiana" from the Italian Government for his work in education and promotion of cultural exchange. Born in Brooklyn, NY, Senator LaValle graduated from Hempstead High School on Long Island. He earned his undergraduate degree at Adelphi College, a degree in education from the State University College at New Paltz, and a J.D. degree from Touro College Jacob D. Fuchsberg Law Center. Senator LaValle has completed extensive graduate study in Government and International Relations at New York University and received an Honorary Doctor of Civil Law Degree from Dowling College. He is a practicing attorney. Senator LaValle is the father of two grown children, James and Lisa and the proud grandfather of Jessica Katherine and Elvis William LaValle, and Joshua Eric and Justin David Russ. He resides in Port Jefferson with his wife Penny. In addition to his standing committee assignments, Senator LaValle is Chairman of the Senate Majority Conference.

Overview
RelSci Relationships

163

Primary Location

Port Jefferson, NY, United States

Birthday

05/22/1939 - Brooklyn, New York

Age

80

Number of Awards

1

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State Senator from the 49th District at New York State Senate

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Deputy Majority Leader at New York State Senate

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Kenneth LaValle
State Senator from the 1st District at New York State Senate
Education
J.D.

Touro College Jacob D. Fuchsberg Law Center.

Master's Degree in Education

The State University of New York at New Paltz, known as SUNY New Paltz for short, is a public college in New Paltz, New York. It traces its origins to the New Paltz Classical School, a secondary institution founded in 1828 and reorganized as an academy in 1833. The College is one of only four SUNY institutions in the New York metropolitan area.

Undergraduate Degree

Adelphi University’s roots reach back to 1863 and the founding of the Adelphi Academy, a private preparatory school in Brooklyn, New York. The Academy was incorporated in 1869 and its Board of Trustees was charged with establishing a first class institution for the broadest and most thorough training, and to make its advantages as accessible as possible to the largest numbers of our population. The school quickly gained a reputation for its innovative curriculum, particularly in physical culture and early childhood education. Adelphi Academy, Brooklyn 1896 The appointment of Charles H. Levermore, Ph.D., as the head of the Academy in 1893 was an important moment in Adelphi’s history. Realizing the city of Brooklyn was without a liberal arts college, Levermore seized the opportunity to establish Adelphi College. Through the efforts of Timothy Woodruff, former lieutenant governor of New York State and future president of Adelphi’s Board of Trustees, Adelphi College, with 57 students and 16 instructors, was granted a charter—one of the earliest charters granted to a coeducational college by the Board of Regents of the State of New York—on June 24, 1896. Henceforth, degrees issued bore the seals of Adelphi College and of the University of the State of New York and were signed by the officers of the College and by the chancellor and the secretary of the University. For the next 25 years, the Academy remained intact yet separate from the College. Over the course of the next 100 years Adelphi grew and changed significantly. In 1929, Adelphi University became the first private, coeducational institution of higher education on Long Island. Since that time, more than 100,000 students have passed through our doors, leaving their mark on the University and the world beyond. Adelphi Cadet Nurse Corps, breaking ground in 1928 Today, Adelphi is thriving. Our colleges and schools include the College of Arts and Sciences; the Gordon F. Derner Institute of Advanced Psychological Studies; the Honors College; the Robert B. Willumstad School of Business; the Ruth S. Ammon School of Education; the School of Nursing; the School of Social Work; and University College. Under the leadership of Robert A. Scott, Ph.D., president of Adelphi since 2000, we have reinvigorated our academic community and invested in our future. Our faculty is leading the way to ensure that our students receive the finest education in the region and that Adelphi continues to serve as a vital resource to our local communities. As we turn our strategic plan into a vision for our future, the campus community has come together to accomplish mutual goals centered on scholarship and student achievement. While universities around the country have been eliminating faculty, Adelphi has hired more than 280 new professors since 2001. Current full- and part-time faculty total 956, with a student/faculty ratio of 10:1. To ensure that our scholars have the resources needed to reach their goals, we have invested millions of dollars in infrastructure. We have renovated our facilities; upgraded our technology and created smart classrooms; dramatically improved our libraries—both facilities and collections; and invested in new equipment, including state-of-the-art lasers for two new physics laboratories, an atomic scanning microscope and a nuclear magnetic resonance machine for the chemistry program, new pianos from Steinway & Sons, and enhanced digital music facilities to support our music and performing arts programs. An ambitious campus expansion project has, over the last decade, resulted in the completion and opening of the Adele and Herbert J. Klapper Center for Fine Arts with space for painting, printmaking, sculpture and ceramics; the Center for Recreation and Sport, containing gyms and an indoor track; the Performing Arts Center (AUPAC) includes a 500-seat Concert Hall and additional performance, rehearsal and classroom space for music, theatre and dance; an outdoor sports complex; a complete renovation of Woodruff Hall with a modern exercise room, pool, teaching gym and classroom; the Alice Brown Early Learning Center; and additional parking. Adelphi today Scholars throughout the University are making significant contributions to their disciplines. In recent years, Adelphi faculty members have been recognized as Fulbright and Hartford Scholars, and have received funding from the National Endowment for the Humanities, the National Institutes of Health and the National Science Foundation. The School of Social Work is accredited for the maximum time that the accrediting agency grants. In fact, our School of Social Work was reaccredited with no recommendations for improvement by the Council on Social Work Education’s site evaluation committee, and the School’s self-study document so impressed the council that it is now used as a model in reaccreditation training sessions for other programs. Currently, nearly 8,000 students are thriving in our classrooms, in our programs, on our sports fields at the main Garden City campus and at centers in Manhattan, Hauppauge, and Poughkeepsie. Our students have gone on to achieve awards and national recognition for their scholarship, service and leadership. Adelphi also seeks to serve its locality, state and nation through the research and practice of its faculty; the strengthening of ties between the professional schools and community; the staging of distinguished cultural events at its campuses; and most essentially, the education of a generation of future leaders and informed citizens, professionals, and community members.

Government & International Relations

Founded in 1831, New York University is now one of the largest private universities in the United States. Of the more than 3,000 colleges and universities in America, New York University is one of only 60 member institutions of the distinguished Association of American Universities. From a student body of 158 during NYU's very first semester, enrollment has grown to more than 40,000 students attending 18 schools and colleges at five major centers in Manhattan and in sites in Africa, Asia, Europe, and South America. Today, students come from every state in the union and from 133 foreign countries. The faculty, which initially consisted of fourteen professors and lecturers (among them artist and inventor Samuel F. B. Morse), now totals over 3,100 full-time members whose research and teaching encompasses the humanities, the sciences, and the social sciences; the law; medicine; business; education; the fine arts, studio art, and the performing and cinematic arts; music; social work; public administration; the ancient world; and continuing and professional studies. With more than 2,500 courses offered, the University awards more than 25 different degrees. Although overall the University is large, the individuals schools and colleges are small- to moderate-sized units—each with its own traditions, programs, and faculty – and there are many communities to be found within the NYU community based on interests, activities, and shared experiences. The center of NYU is its Washington Square campus in the heart of Greenwich Village. One of the city's most creative and energetic communities, the Village is a historic neighborhood that has attracted generations of writers, musicians, artists, and intellectuals. NYU, in keeping with its founder’s vision, is “in and of the city”: the University – which has no walls and no gates – is deeply intertwined with New York City, drawing inspiration from its vitality. In addition to its Manhattan locations, the University is also formally affiliated the Polytechnic Institute of NYU in Brooklyn, the second oldest school of engineering and technology in the country, and has research facilities, notably the Nelson Institute of Environmental Medicine, in Sterling Forest, near Tuxedo, New York. And NYU has established itself as the first global network university, with a comprehensive liberal arts campus in Abu Dhabi – the first to be operated abroad by a major U.S. research university – and other sites for study and research in Accra, Ghana; Berlin, Germany; Buenos Aires, Argentina; Florence, Italy; London, England; Madrid, Spain; Paris, France; Prague, the Czech Republic; Shanghai, China; and Tel Aviv, Israel, among other locations.

Career History
State Senator from the 1st District
1977 - Current

The New York State Senate, under the State's first Constitution which was adopted in 1777, consisted of 24 members, elected from and by the freeholders of the state possessing one hundred pounds over and above all indebtedness. The members were apportioned among four great districts and were chosen for four-year terms, the length of the first term to be decided after the election, by lot, with the terms of six members expiring each year. An additional Senator was to be added to each district whenever it was shown, by a septennial census, that the number of electors within the district had increased one twenty-fourth. The maximum number to which the Senate could be increased was placed at 100. When, after the census of 1795, the number of Senators had been increased to 43, the rule was found to be unequal in its operation and, in 1801, the Constitution was amended fixing the number at 32.

Awards & Honors
Dowling College
Other Affiliations

Kenneth LaValle is affiliated with New York State Senate

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