John Jenkins Barrow

Representative from Georgia

John Jenkins Barrow

John Jenkins Barrow

Representative from Georgia

Biography

BARROW, John, Representative from Georgia; born in Ga., October 31, 1955; graduated from Clarke Central High School, Athens-Clarke County, Ga., 1973; B.A., University of Georgia, Athens, Ga., 1976; J.D., Harvard University, Cambridge, Mass., 1979; lawyer, private practice; Athens-Clarke, Georgia, city-county commissioner, 1990-2004; elected as a Democrat to the One Hundred Ninth and to the third succeeding Congresses (January 3, 2005-present).

Overview
RelSci Relationships

20

Primary Location

Augusta, GA, United States

Birthday

10/1955 - Athens, GA, United States

Age

62

Relationships
RelSci Relationships are individuals John Jenkins Barrow likely has professional access to. A relationship does not necessarily indicate a personal connection.

Relationship likelihood: Strong

Member, Board of Directors at American Red Cross - Southeast and Coastal Georgia

Relationship likelihood: Strong

Relationship likelihood: Strong

Former Legislative Director at Office of the Representative from Georgia's 12th District, John Barrow

Relationship likelihood: Average

Former District Director at Office of the Representative from Georgia's 12th District, John Barrow

Relationship likelihood: Average

Former Chief of Staff at Office of the Representative from Georgia's 12th District, John Barrow

Relationship likelihood: Average

Director at Greenberg Traurig LLP

Relationship likelihood: Average

Legislative Director at Office of the Representative from Pennsylvania's 3rd District, Mike Kelly

Relationship likelihood: Average

Treasurer at Texas Access to Justice Foundation

Relationship likelihood: Weak

Representative at Office of the Representative from California's 16th District, Jim Costa

Relationship likelihood: Weak

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John Jenkins Barrow
Representative from Georgia
Family Members
Education
Juris Doctor
Class of 1979

Harvard Law School offers an energetic and creative learning environment, a diverse and dedicated faculty—whose expertise spans a broad array of legal subjects—and a student body that comes from every state in the U.S. and more than 70 countries around the world. Approximately 1,900 students attend HLS each year: 1,680 J.D. students, 160 LL.M. students, and 50 S.J.D. candidates. The faculty includes more than 100 full-time professors and more than 150 visiting professors, lecturers on law, and instructors. The curriculum features more than 260 courses and seminars that cover a broad range of traditional and emerging legal fields. A Harvard Law education prepares students for success in law practice, business, public service, teaching, and more. Most HLS students are pursuing a J.D. (Juris Doctor) degree, while many others are earning an LL.M. (Master of Laws) or the S.J.D. (Doctor of Juridical Science). Harvard Law School also offers many joint degree programs, coordinated programs, and concurrent degree opportunities with other schools within Harvard University. The Law School community is also home to numerous research programs and engaging publications, including books, scholarly periodicals, newsletters, and a weekly student newspaper.

Attendee
Class of 1973
B.A., Political Science
Class of 1976

When the University of Georgia was incorporated by an act of the General Assembly on January 27, 1785, Georgia became the first state to charter a state-supported university. In 1784 the General Assembly had set aside 40,000 acres of land to endow a college or seminary of learning. At the first meeting of the board of trustees, held in Augusta on February 13, 1786, Abraham Baldwin was selected president of the university. A native of Connecticut and a graduate of Yale University, Baldwin -- who had come to Georgia in 1784 -- drafted the charter adopted by the General Assembly. The university was actually established in 1801 when a committee of the board of trustees selected a land site. John Milledge, later a governor of the state, purchased and gave to the board of trustees the chosen tract of 633 acres on the banks of the Oconee River in northeast Georgia. Josiah Meigs was named president of the university and work was begun on the first building, originally called Franklin College in honor of Benjamin Franklin and now known as Old College. The university graduated its first class in 1804. The curriculum of traditional classical studies was broadened in 1843 to include courses in law, and again in 1872 when the university received federal funds for instruction in agriculture and mechanical arts. Seventeen colleges and schools, with auxiliary divisions, carry on the university’s programs of teaching, research, and service. These colleges and schools and the dates of their establishment as separate administrative units are: Franklin College of Arts and Sciences, 1801; College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences, 1859; School of Law, 1859; College of Pharmacy, 1903; D. B. Daniel B. Warnell School of Forestry and Natural Resources, 1906; College of Education, 1908; Graduate School, 1910; C. Herman and Mary Virginia Terry College of Business, 1912; Henry W. Grady College of Journalism and Mass Communication, 1915; College of Family and Consumer Sciences, 1933; College of Veterinary Medicine, 1946; School of Social Work, 1964; College of Environment and Design, 1969; School of Public and International Affairs, 2001; the College of Public Health, 2005, the Odum School of Ecology, 2007 and the College of Engineering, 2012. The Division of General Extension, now the Georgia Center for Continuing Education Conference Center & Hotel, was incorporated into the university in 1947. In 1931 the General Assembly of Georgia placed all state-supported institutions of higher education, including UGA, under the jurisdiction of a single board. This organization, known as the University System of Georgia, is governed by the board of regents. The board of regents’ executive officer, the chancellor, exercises a general supervisory control over all institutions of the University System, with each institution having its own executive officers and faculty.

Memberships
Co-Chair for Administration
Current

The Blue Dog Coalition, commonly known as the Blue Dogs or Blue Dog Democrats, is a caucus of United States Congressional Representatives from the Democratic Party who identify as conservative Democrats. It was formed in 1995 during the 104th Congress to give more conservative members from the Democratic party a unified voice after the Democrats' loss of Congress in the U.S. Congressional election of 1994. Blue Dog Coalition membership experienced a rapid decline in the 2010s, holding 14 seats in the 114th Congress.The 115th Congress has seen the Coalition grow to 18 members.

Career History
Political Donations
$250
2008

Former United States Attorney for the Southern District of Georgia at United States Department of Justice

$250
2004

Chief Executive Officer at County of DeKalb (Georgia)

$587
2004
Political Donations Received
$2,000
2014
$250
2014
$400
2014
Other Affiliations
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