Jo Ann Jenkins

Chief Executive Officer & Director at AARP, Inc. (District of Columbia)

Jo Ann Jenkins

Jo Ann Jenkins

Chief Executive Officer & Director at AARP, Inc. (District of Columbia)

Overview
Career Highlights

The Library of Congress
AARP Foundation
AARP, Inc. (District of Columbia)

RelSci Relationships

2434

Number of Boards

16

Birthday

1958

Age

62

Number of Awards

9

Relationships
RelSci Relationships are individuals Jo Ann Jenkins likely has professional access to. A relationship does not necessarily indicate a personal connection.

Executive Vice President & Chief Operating Officer at AARP, Inc. (District of Columbia)

Relationship likelihood: Strong

Emeritus Professor of Physics & Astronomy at Rice University

Relationship likelihood: Strong

Former President at AARP, Inc. (District of Columbia)

Relationship likelihood: Strong

Co-Founding Partner at Forrestal Capital LLC

Relationship likelihood: Strong

Former Managing Director-Finance & Internal Audit at Accenture, Inc. (Delaware)

Relationship likelihood: Strong

Secretary, Treasurer & Director at AARP, Inc. (District of Columbia)

Relationship likelihood: Strong

Former Chief Human Resources Officer & Vice President-People at Southwest Airlines Co.

Relationship likelihood: Strong

Former Chief Marketing Officer & Executive Vice President at Cigna Holding Co.

Relationship likelihood: Strong

Executive Vice President & Chief Financial Officer at AARP Employees Pension Plan

Relationship likelihood: Strong

Head-Business Development & Innovation at The Advertising Council

Relationship likelihood: Strong

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Jo Ann Jenkins
Chief Executive Officer & Director at AARP, Inc. (District of Columbia)
Education
Bachelor of Science
Class of 1980
Memberships
Member
Current

The participating CEOs lead companies that collectively employ more than five million people, generate more than $2 trillion in annual revenue, and represent 11 countries and a diverse group of industries.

Career History
President
2010 - 2013

A country free of poverty and where no older person feels vulnerable. See Schedule O.AARP Foundation serves vulnerable people 50+ by creating and advancing effective solutions that help them secure the essentials.

Chief Operating Officer
1994 - 2010

The Library of Congress was established by an act of Congress in 1800 when President John Adams signed a bill providing for the transfer of the seat of government from Philadelphia to the new capital city of Washington. The legislation described a reference library for Congress only, containing "such books as may be necessary for the use of Congress - and for putting up a suitable apartment for containing them therein…" Established with $5,000 appropriated by the legislation, the original library was housed in the new Capitol until August 1814, when invading British troops set fire to the Capitol Building, burning and pillaging the contents of the small library. Within a month, retired President Thomas Jefferson offered his personal library as a replacement. Jefferson had spent 50 years accumulating books, "putting by everything which related to America, and indeed whatever was rare and valuable in every science"; his library was considered to be one of the finest in the United States. In offering his collection to Congress, Jefferson anticipated controversy over the nature of his collection, which included books in foreign languages and volumes of philosophy, science, literature, and other topics not normally viewed as part of a legislative library. He wrote, "I do not know that it contains any branch of science which Congress would wish to exclude from their collection; there is, in fact, no subject to which a Member of Congress may not have occasion to refer." In January 1815, Congress accepted Jefferson's offer, appropriating $23,950 for his 6,487 books, and the foundation was laid for a great national library. The Jeffersonian concept of universality, the belief that all subjects are important to the library of the American legislature, is the philosophy and rationale behind the comprehensive collecting policies of today's Library of Congress. Ainsworth Rand Spofford, Librarian of Congress from 1864 to 1897, applied Jefferson's philosophy on a grand scale and built the Library into a national institution. Spofford was responsible for the copyright law of 1870, which required all copyright applicants to send to the Library two copies of their work. This resulted in a flood of books, pamphlets, maps, music, prints, and photographs. Facing a shortage of shelf space at the Capitol, Spofford convinced Congress of the need for a new building, and in 1873 Congress authorized a competition to design plans for the new Library. In 1886, after many proposals and much controversy, Congress authorized construction of a new Library building in the style of the Italian Renaissance in accordance with a design prepared by Washington architects John L. Smithmeyer and Paul J. Pelz. The Congressional authorization was successful because of the hard work of two key Senators: Daniel W. Voorhees (Indiana), who served as chairman of the Joint Committee from 1879 to 1881, and Justin S. Morrill (Vermont), chairman of Senate Committee on Buildings and Grounds. In 1888, General Thomas Lincoln Casey, chief of the Army Corps of Engineers, was placed in charge of construction. His chief assistant was Bernard R. Green, who was intimately involved with the building until his death in 1914. Beginning in 1892, a new architect, Edward Pearce Casey, the son of General Casey, began to supervise the interior work, including sculptural and painted decoration by more than 50 American artists. When the Library of Congress building opened its doors to the public on November 1, 1897, it was hailed as a glorious national monument and "the largest, the costliest, and the safest" library building in the world.

Office of Advocacy & Enterprise
1990 - 1993

The United States Department of Agriculture (USDA), also known as the Agriculture Department, is the U.S. federal executive department responsible for developing and executing federal government policy on farming, agriculture, forestry, and food. It aims to meet the needs of farmers and ranchers, promote agricultural trade and production, work to assure food safety, protect natural resources, foster rural communities and end hunger in the United States and abroad.

Boards & Committees
Member, Board of Directors
2020 - Current
Independent Director
2018 - Current
Member, National Advisory Board
Prior
Chief Executive Officer & Director
2004 - Current
Member, Opportunity Nation Leadership Council
Current
Secretary, Board of Directors
Current
Non-Profit Donations & Grants

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$10K +
2018
$10K +
2017
$10K +
2016
Public Holdings
Restricted data only for RelSci Professional users.
Awards & Honors
2020
Barron's Magazine - 100 Most Influential Women in U.S. Finance
2017
NonProfit Times - Power and Influence Top 50
2016
NonProfit Times - Power and Influence Top 50
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