Gregory J. Hlibok

Chief of the Disability Rights Office, Consumer & Governmental Affairs Bureau at Federal Communications Commission

Gregory J. Hlibok

Gregory J. Hlibok

Chief of the Disability Rights Office, Consumer & Governmental Affairs Bureau at Federal Communications Commission

Biography

Hlibok oversees several critical rule making proceedings on the implementation of the 21st century Communications and Video Accessibility Act and the development of Telecommunications Relay Service (TRS) and various issues on accessibility of communication technologies. Since 2001 with DRO, his work contributes to progress in TRS, from one type of service, TTY to several types of services, Video Relay Service, IP Relay, and Captioned Telephone as well as increasing captioned programs on television. In his early career, Greg served in two capacities, as a private practising attorney and a financial consultant. Admitted to the New York Bar, Greg holds a BA in Government from Gallaudet University and a JD from Hofstra University School of Law. He is vice president of Board of Trustees of his alma mater, Lexington School for the Deaf. He is an active member of several organizations, including Telecommunications for the Deaf, Inc, National Association of the Deaf and Maryland Association of the Deaf. He is known for his leadership role during the Deaf President Now movement at Gallaudet University in 1988.

Overview
RelSci Relationships

1146

Number of Boards

3

Relationships
RelSci Relationships are individuals Gregory J. Hlibok likely has professional access to. A relationship does not necessarily indicate a personal connection.

President at LEXINGTON SCHOOL INC

Relationship likelihood: Strong

Trustee at Lexington School and Center for the Deaf

Relationship likelihood: Strong

Trustee at Lexington School and Center for the Deaf

Relationship likelihood: Strong

Trustee at Lexington School and Center for the Deaf

Relationship likelihood: Strong

Public Engagement Advisor for the Disability Community at Office of Public Engagement

Relationship likelihood: Strong

Trustee at Lexington School and Center for the Deaf

Relationship likelihood: Strong

Trustee at Lexington School and Center for the Deaf

Relationship likelihood: Strong

Trustee at Lexington School and Center for the Deaf

Relationship likelihood: Strong

Trustee at Lexington School and Center for the Deaf

Relationship likelihood: Strong

Professional at International Business Machines Corporation

Relationship likelihood: Strong

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Gregory J. Hlibok
Chief of the Disability Rights Office, Consumer & Governmental Affairs Bureau at Federal Communications Commission
Education
JD

The Maurice A. Deane School of Law at Hofstra University is located in Hempstead, New York. Founded in 1970 and accredited by the ABA in 1971, the school offers a JD, a joint JD/MBA degree, and LL.M degrees in American Law (for foreign law graduates) and Family law. Hofstra Law School is located on the southern portion of the 240-acre (0.97 km2) Hofstra University campus, in Hempstead, New York. The school was renamed to the Maurice A. Deane School of Law at Hofstra University in September 2011.

BA in Government

Gallaudet University is a federally chartered private university for the education of the Deaf and hard of hearing located in Washington, D.C., on a 99 acres (0.40 km2) campus. Founded in 1864, Gallaudet University was originally a grammar school for both deaf and blind children. It was the first school for the advanced education of the deaf and hard of hearing in the world and remains the only higher education institution in which all programs and services are specifically designed to accommodate deaf and hard of hearing students. Hearing students are admitted to the graduate school and a small number are also admitted as undergraduates each year. The university was named after Thomas Hopkins Gallaudet, a notable figure in the advancement of deaf education, who himself was not deaf.

Memberships
Member
Current

The mission of the National Association of the Deaf is to preserve, protect and promote the civil, human and linguistic rights of deaf and hard of hearing people in the United States of America.

Career History
Chief of the Disability Rights Office, Consumer & Governmental Affairs Bureau
Current

The Federal Communications Commission regulates interstate and international communications by radio, television, wire, satellite and cable in all 50 states, the District of Columbia and U.S. territories. It was established by the Communications Act of 1934 and operates as an independent U.S. government agency overseen by Congress. The commission is committed to being a responsive, efficient and effective agency capable of facing the technological and economic opportunities of the new millennium.

Boards & Committees
Vice President, Board of Trustees
Current

Lexington School and Center for the Deaf is comprised of the Lexington School for the Deaf, the Lexington Hearing and Speech Center, Lexington Vocational Services, and the Lexington Center for Mental Health. We are here to serve the needs of the deaf and hard-of-hearing community in New York City. The Lexington School, founded in 1865, is the largest school for deaf students in New York State. It educates deaf children from ages 0-21. It is unique among schools for the deaf in its use of an innovative teaching model called "mediated learning experience (MLE).” MLE stresses the importance of the adult "mediator” in the child’s learning and provides teacher and parent training based on this theoretical framework. Scores on standardized tests attained by Lexington students attest to the effectiveness of MLE in improving the educational attainment of deaf students. Lexington students come from all over the five boroughs, and a number of students have other disabilities in addition to deafness, including mobility and mental impairments. Lexington prepares all students to continue on to college, vocational education, job training, or a placement that will support them to live a responsible, productive life.

Non-Profit Donations & Grants

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$5 - $99
2015

Lexington School and Center for the Deaf is comprised of the Lexington School for the Deaf, the Lexington Hearing and Speech Center, Lexington Vocational Services, and the Lexington Center for Mental Health. We are here to serve the needs of the deaf and hard-of-hearing community in New York City. The Lexington School, founded in 1865, is the largest school for deaf students in New York State. It educates deaf children from ages 0-21. It is unique among schools for the deaf in its use of an innovative teaching model called "mediated learning experience (MLE).” MLE stresses the importance of the adult "mediator” in the child’s learning and provides teacher and parent training based on this theoretical framework. Scores on standardized tests attained by Lexington students attest to the effectiveness of MLE in improving the educational attainment of deaf students. Lexington students come from all over the five boroughs, and a number of students have other disabilities in addition to deafness, including mobility and mental impairments. Lexington prepares all students to continue on to college, vocational education, job training, or a placement that will support them to live a responsible, productive life.

$50 - $499
2013

Gallaudet University is a federally chartered private university for the education of the Deaf and hard of hearing located in Washington, D.C., on a 99 acres (0.40 km2) campus. Founded in 1864, Gallaudet University was originally a grammar school for both deaf and blind children. It was the first school for the advanced education of the deaf and hard of hearing in the world and remains the only higher education institution in which all programs and services are specifically designed to accommodate deaf and hard of hearing students. Hearing students are admitted to the graduate school and a small number are also admitted as undergraduates each year. The university was named after Thomas Hopkins Gallaudet, a notable figure in the advancement of deaf education, who himself was not deaf.

$100 - $499
2012

Lexington School and Center for the Deaf is comprised of the Lexington School for the Deaf, the Lexington Hearing and Speech Center, Lexington Vocational Services, and the Lexington Center for Mental Health. We are here to serve the needs of the deaf and hard-of-hearing community in New York City. The Lexington School, founded in 1865, is the largest school for deaf students in New York State. It educates deaf children from ages 0-21. It is unique among schools for the deaf in its use of an innovative teaching model called "mediated learning experience (MLE).” MLE stresses the importance of the adult "mediator” in the child’s learning and provides teacher and parent training based on this theoretical framework. Scores on standardized tests attained by Lexington students attest to the effectiveness of MLE in improving the educational attainment of deaf students. Lexington students come from all over the five boroughs, and a number of students have other disabilities in addition to deafness, including mobility and mental impairments. Lexington prepares all students to continue on to college, vocational education, job training, or a placement that will support them to live a responsible, productive life.

Other Affiliations
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