Gene Chasin

Chief Operating Officer at Say Yes to Education Foundation

Gene Chasin

Gene Chasin

Chief Operating Officer at Say Yes to Education Foundation

Overview
Career Highlights

Say Yes to Education Foundation
Say Yes to Education, Inc.
Accelerated Schools

RelSci Relationships

1189

Number of Boards

2

Contact Data
Trying to get in touch with Gene Chasin? Subscribe today to access their professional contact information and receive a one time promotion of free Contact Data credits!
Relationships
RelSci Relationships are individuals Gene Chasin likely has professional access to. A relationship does not necessarily indicate a personal connection.

Fund Advisor at Weiss Multi-Strategy Advisers LLC

Relationship likelihood: Strong

President at Say Yes to Education Foundation

Relationship likelihood: Strong

President & Chief Executive Officer at Community Foundation for Greater Buffalo, Inc.

Relationship likelihood: Strong

Chief Business Development Officer at FS Investments

Relationship likelihood: Strong

President & Chief Executive Officer at Raymour & Flanigan Furniture

Relationship likelihood: Strong

Former Director at American Institutes for Research in the Behavioral Sciences

Relationship likelihood: Strong

President & Chief Executive Officer at Springleaf General Services Corporation

Relationship likelihood: Strong

Faculty Member at New York University - The Steinhardt Institute of Higher Education Policy at Steinhardt School of Culture, Education, and Human Development

Relationship likelihood: Strong

Senior Director at The Ackman-Ziff Real Estate Group LLC

Relationship likelihood: Strong

Member, Board of Directors at Say Yes to Education Foundation

Relationship likelihood: Strong

Paths to Gene Chasin
Potential Connections via
Relationship Science
You
Gene Chasin
Chief Operating Officer at Say Yes to Education Foundation
Education
BA in Liberal Studies & Education

California Polytechnic State University or California Polytechnic State University, San Luis Obispo, also known as Cal Poly San Luis Obispo or Cal Poly, is a public university located in San Luis Obispo, California, United States. Founded in 1901 as a vocational high school, it is currently one of only two polytechnic universities in the 23-member California State University system. Comprising six distinct colleges, the university offers 147 bachelor's degrees, 49 master's degrees, and 7 teaching credentials. The university does not confer doctoral degrees.

MA in Educational Administration

Our mission is to promote learning in the Jesuit Catholic tradition. The university offers undergraduate, graduate and professional students the knowledge and skills needed to succeed, and the values and sensitivity necessary to be men and women for others.

Career History
Chief Executive Officer
Prior

TO OPERATE A PREPARATORY SCHOOL FOR CHILDREN IN ELEMENTARY GRADES THROUGH HIGH SCHOOL AND, , FOREIGN HIGH SCHOOL STUDENTS NEEDING TUTORING, COLLEGE PREPARATORY, ADVANCED STUDIES, AND ENGLISH LANGUAGE INSTRUCTION.

Director, Institute for Urban School Improvement
Prior

The University of Connecticut (UConn) is a public research university in Connecticut. Known as a Public Ivy,[3] UConn was founded in 1881 and is a Land Grant and Sea Grant college & member of the Space Grant Consortium. The institution serves more than 30,000 students on its six campuses, including more than 8,000 graduate students in multiple programs.[4] UConn's main campus is in Storrs, Connecticut. The university's president is Susan Herbst.[5] UConn is one of the founding institutions of the Hartford, Connecticut/Springfield, Massachusetts regional economic and cultural partnership alliance known as New England's Knowledge Corridor. UConn is a member of Universitas 21, a global network of 24 research-intensive universities, who work together to foster global citizenship and institutional innovation through research-inspired teaching and learning, student mobility, connecting students and staff, and promote advocacy for internationalisation.[6] UConn is accredited by the New England Association of Schools and Colleges.

President
Current

Say Yes is a national, non-profit organization committed to dramatically increasing high school and college graduation rates for the nation's urban youth. Research (including 20 years of field-based experience and the results of a comprehensive literature review conducted by the American Institutes for Research) has shown that the primary obstacles to post-secondary access for low-income students fall into four key domains: Academic - many students arrive at urban elementary school without the benefit of access to high-quality preschool programs and without school literacy preparation. This experience and skill gap often leads to behavioral and/or academic problems in school, as well as lower academic expectations, a focus on behavioral management rather than on education, inadequate challenge and support, and increased placement into special education. Additionally, urban schools tend to be under-resourced in comparison to suburban schools ? this translates into higher turn-over rates for qualified teachers, less access to technology for students, and fewer arts and extra-curricular programs even though these schools often have more challenging program needs (e.g., English Language Learners). And, children from lower-income families are less likely than their more affluent peers to have easy access to technology (see Towards Equality of Access, Gates Foundation, 2004) as well as to the use of technology to promote creativity and higher order thinking. Social-emotional - urban schools often lack the resources and political momentum to provide high-quality social-emotional curricular programs. Additionally, many urban schools lack the capacity or will to support and foster strong family and student engagement Health - students and families often lack access to adequate health care, which leads to undiagnosed and sometimes untreated physical and mental health problems that in turn may cause school absence and poor performance relative to ability Financial - many urban

Boards & Committees
Member, Operating Committee
Current

Say Yes Buffalo is a landmark collaboration that brings the Buffalo Public School District, the Buffalo Teachers’ Federation, the Buffalo Association of Administrators and Supervisors, the City of Buffalo, Erie County, Say Yes to Education, Inc., and a diverse group of Buffalo area corporate, non-profit, and philanthropic organizations together to organize people, time, money and resources to provide holistic, year-round support to Buffalo Public School District students throughout their K-12 years and beyond. Say Yes Buffalo and its partners believe every student can graduate high school and college when given the proper supports, resources, and opportunities.

Vice President
Prior

Say Yes is a national, non-profit organization committed to dramatically increasing high school and college graduation rates for the nation's urban youth. Research (including 20 years of field-based experience and the results of a comprehensive literature review conducted by the American Institutes for Research) has shown that the primary obstacles to post-secondary access for low-income students fall into four key domains: Academic - many students arrive at urban elementary school without the benefit of access to high-quality preschool programs and without school literacy preparation. This experience and skill gap often leads to behavioral and/or academic problems in school, as well as lower academic expectations, a focus on behavioral management rather than on education, inadequate challenge and support, and increased placement into special education. Additionally, urban schools tend to be under-resourced in comparison to suburban schools ? this translates into higher turn-over rates for qualified teachers, less access to technology for students, and fewer arts and extra-curricular programs even though these schools often have more challenging program needs (e.g., English Language Learners). And, children from lower-income families are less likely than their more affluent peers to have easy access to technology (see Towards Equality of Access, Gates Foundation, 2004) as well as to the use of technology to promote creativity and higher order thinking. Social-emotional - urban schools often lack the resources and political momentum to provide high-quality social-emotional curricular programs. Additionally, many urban schools lack the capacity or will to support and foster strong family and student engagement Health - students and families often lack access to adequate health care, which leads to undiagnosed and sometimes untreated physical and mental health problems that in turn may cause school absence and poor performance relative to ability Financial - many urban

This web site is not endorsed by, directly affiliated with, maintained, authorized, or sponsored by Gene Chasin. The use of any trade name or trademark is for identification and reference purposes only and does not imply any association with the trademark holder. The Presence of Gene Chasin's profile does not indicate a business or promotional relationship of any kind between RelSci and Gene Chasin.