Gary T. Johnson

President at Chicago History Museum

Gary T. Johnson

Gary T. Johnson

President at Chicago History Museum

Overview
Career Highlights

Chicago History Museum

RelSci Relationships

1426

Primary Location

Chicago, IL, United States

Number of Boards

6

Number of Awards

1

Relationships
RelSci Relationships are individuals Gary T. Johnson likely has professional access to. A relationship does not necessarily indicate a personal connection.

Practice Leader Real Estate at Jones Day

Relationship likelihood: Strong

Chairman Emeritus at William Blair & Company LLC

Relationship likelihood: Strong

Vice President, Finance & Chief Financial Officer at Chicago History Museum

Relationship likelihood: Strong

Director, Exhibitions at Chicago History Museum

Relationship likelihood: Strong

Trustee Liaison, Dean of Multicultural Affairs at The Latin School of Chicago

Relationship likelihood: Strong

Pritzker Director & Chief Executive Officer at Museum of Contemporary Art

Relationship likelihood: Strong

Through Ownership/Position at Front Barnett Associates LLC

Relationship likelihood: Strong

Chairman & Chief Executive Officer at Parkside Realty, Inc.

Relationship likelihood: Strong

President at Start Early

Relationship likelihood: Strong

President & Chief Executive Officer at The Dusable Museum of African American History, Inc.

Relationship likelihood: Strong

In The News
Crain's Chicago Business
September 7, 2015
WHO'S WHO IN CHICAGO BUSINESS : CULTURAL INSTITUTIONS
Crain's Chicago Business
September 1, 2014
WHO'S WHO IN CHICAGO BUSINESS
Paths to Gary T. Johnson
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Gary T. Johnson
President at Chicago History Museum
Education
JD
Class of 1977

Harvard Law School offers an energetic and creative learning environment, a diverse and dedicated faculty—whose expertise spans a broad array of legal subjects—and a student body that comes from every state in the U.S. and more than 70 countries around the world. Approximately 1,900 students attend HLS each year: 1,680 J.D. students, 160 LL.M. students, and 50 S.J.D. candidates. The faculty includes more than 100 full-time professors and more than 150 visiting professors, lecturers on law, and instructors. The curriculum features more than 260 courses and seminars that cover a broad range of traditional and emerging legal fields. A Harvard Law education prepares students for success in law practice, business, public service, teaching, and more. Most HLS students are pursuing a J.D. (Juris Doctor) degree, while many others are earning an LL.M. (Master of Laws) or the S.J.D. (Doctor of Juridical Science). Harvard Law School also offers many joint degree programs, coordinated programs, and concurrent degree opportunities with other schools within Harvard University. The Law School community is also home to numerous research programs and engaging publications, including books, scholarly periodicals, newsletters, and a weekly student newspaper.

MA in Modern History
Class of 1974

Oxford is a collegiate university, consisting of the central University and colleges. The central University is composed of academic departments and research centres, administrative departments, libraries and museums. The 38 colleges are self-governing and financially independent institutions, which are related to the central University in a federal system. There are also six permanent private halls, which were founded by different Christian denominations and which still retain their Christian character.

AB in History & Political Science, summa cum laude, Phi Beta Kappa
Class of 1972

Yale University is an American private Ivy League research university located in New Haven, Connecticut. Founded in 1701 in the Colony of Connecticut, the university is the third-oldest institution of higher education in the United States.

Career History
Partner
1994 - 2005

Jones Day LP provides legal services. The company's practice areas include banking and finance, capital markets, mergers & acquisitions, real estate, government regulations, tax, financial institutions litigation and regulation, business restructuring, and private equity. It offers services to the airlines, aviation, automotive, construction, energy, healthcare, insurance, media, pharmaceuticals and telecommunication industries. Jones Day was founded in March 1893 by Edwin J. Blandin and William Lowe Rice and is headquartered in Cleveland, Ohio.

Attorney
1977 - 1994

Mayer Brown LLP provides legal services in areas of banking and finance; corporate and securities; litigation and dispute resolution; antitrust and competition; U.S. Supreme Court and appellate matters; employment and benefits; environmental; financial services regulatory and enforcement; government and global trade; intellectual property; real estate; tax; restructuring, bankruptcy and insolvency; and wealth management. The company was founded in 1881 and is headquartered in Chicago, IL.

President
Current

The Chicago History Museum (CHM) is the city’s oldest cultural institution. Founded in 1856 and incorporated in 1857 by an act of the state legislature, the Chicago Historical Society and its collection grew and opened its first building at the corner of Dearborn and Ontario Streets. That building and the most of the collection, however, burned during the Great Fire of 1871. After three years and a second fire that destroyed most of the remaining collection, the Society renewed its operations. Occupying temporary buildings on the same site until 1896, the organization built a massive stone edifice designed by Henry Ives Cobb, which housed the Gilpin Library and exhibition spaces. In 1920, the Society purchased thousands of manuscripts and hundreds of paintings and historical artifacts from the estate of Charles F. Gunther, including the bed on which Abraham Lincoln died and George Washington’s compass. In the late 1920s, the trustees began planning a new $1 million museum to house its growing collection and to celebrate the city’s centennial. Designed by Graham, Anderson, Probst & White, the Georgian colonial building opened in 1932 in Lincoln Park at Clark Street at North Avenue. That building, with various additions, renovations, and improvements, has served as the organization's home ever since. In 1972, the Society unveiled a modern limestone addition by Alfred Shaw and Associates. In 1988, Holabird and Root "wrapped" the limestone addition in a red brick modern adaptation of the 1932 building and added underground storage and new gallery spaces. In February 2006, the Chicago Historical Society announced its new name: The Chicago History Museum. After renovating approximately 75 percent of its public space, the Museum now features a dramatic new lobby as well as new galleries and exhibitions and a redesigned Museum Store.

Boards & Committees
Member, Board of Directors
Current

A BUSINESS ASSOCIATION FOR THE ADVANCEMENT OF MEMBER MUSEUMS LOCATED ON CHICAGO PARK DISTRICT LAND THROUGHOUT THE CITY OF CHICAGO.

Member, Advisory Board
Current

After School Matters is a non-profit organization that offers Chicago teens innovative out-of-school activities through science, sports, tech, words, and the nationally recognized gallery programs. It provides these programs through a network of public and private partnerships that include the City of Chicago, Chicago Public Schools, Chicago Park District, Chicago Public Library, and community organizations throughout the city. It has been recognized nationally for its innovative approach to coordinating city resources and delivering unique and diverse programs. Its hands-on, project-based programs expose teens to rewarding careers and help them develop marketable job skills.

Senior Member, Board of Trustees
Current

Latin School was formed in 1888 when a group of parents in Chicago enlisted Mabel Slade Vickery, a teacher from the East Coast to take charge of a new, parent-owned school. The first class consisted of 10 boys approximately 10 years old. The school was designed to provide students with a rigorous college-preparatory education in the classical tradition, with a curriculum that was heavily influenced by Classical studies and the study of the Greek and Latin languages, hence the name “Latin School."

Non-Profit Donations & Grants

Learn how non-profit organizations benefit from RelSci
$1,000 - $10K
2009

The Chicago History Museum (CHM) is the city’s oldest cultural institution. Founded in 1856 and incorporated in 1857 by an act of the state legislature, the Chicago Historical Society and its collection grew and opened its first building at the corner of Dearborn and Ontario Streets. That building and the most of the collection, however, burned during the Great Fire of 1871. After three years and a second fire that destroyed most of the remaining collection, the Society renewed its operations. Occupying temporary buildings on the same site until 1896, the organization built a massive stone edifice designed by Henry Ives Cobb, which housed the Gilpin Library and exhibition spaces. In 1920, the Society purchased thousands of manuscripts and hundreds of paintings and historical artifacts from the estate of Charles F. Gunther, including the bed on which Abraham Lincoln died and George Washington’s compass. In the late 1920s, the trustees began planning a new $1 million museum to house its growing collection and to celebrate the city’s centennial. Designed by Graham, Anderson, Probst & White, the Georgian colonial building opened in 1932 in Lincoln Park at Clark Street at North Avenue. That building, with various additions, renovations, and improvements, has served as the organization's home ever since. In 1972, the Society unveiled a modern limestone addition by Alfred Shaw and Associates. In 1988, Holabird and Root "wrapped" the limestone addition in a red brick modern adaptation of the 1932 building and added underground storage and new gallery spaces. In February 2006, the Chicago Historical Society announced its new name: The Chicago History Museum. After renovating approximately 75 percent of its public space, the Museum now features a dramatic new lobby as well as new galleries and exhibitions and a redesigned Museum Store.

$250 - $499
2007

The Chicago History Museum (CHM) is the city’s oldest cultural institution. Founded in 1856 and incorporated in 1857 by an act of the state legislature, the Chicago Historical Society and its collection grew and opened its first building at the corner of Dearborn and Ontario Streets. That building and the most of the collection, however, burned during the Great Fire of 1871. After three years and a second fire that destroyed most of the remaining collection, the Society renewed its operations. Occupying temporary buildings on the same site until 1896, the organization built a massive stone edifice designed by Henry Ives Cobb, which housed the Gilpin Library and exhibition spaces. In 1920, the Society purchased thousands of manuscripts and hundreds of paintings and historical artifacts from the estate of Charles F. Gunther, including the bed on which Abraham Lincoln died and George Washington’s compass. In the late 1920s, the trustees began planning a new $1 million museum to house its growing collection and to celebrate the city’s centennial. Designed by Graham, Anderson, Probst & White, the Georgian colonial building opened in 1932 in Lincoln Park at Clark Street at North Avenue. That building, with various additions, renovations, and improvements, has served as the organization's home ever since. In 1972, the Society unveiled a modern limestone addition by Alfred Shaw and Associates. In 1988, Holabird and Root "wrapped" the limestone addition in a red brick modern adaptation of the 1932 building and added underground storage and new gallery spaces. In February 2006, the Chicago Historical Society announced its new name: The Chicago History Museum. After renovating approximately 75 percent of its public space, the Museum now features a dramatic new lobby as well as new galleries and exhibitions and a redesigned Museum Store.

Political Donations
$250
2004

Former President of United States

Awards & Honors
Rhodes Scholarship
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