Evan Chesler

Partner at Cravath, Swaine & Moore LLP

Evan Chesler

Evan Chesler

Partner at Cravath, Swaine & Moore LLP

Overview
Career Highlights

Cravath, Swaine & Moore LLP

RelSci Relationships

5033

Number of Boards

12

Number of Awards

73

Contact Data
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Relationships
RelSci Relationships are individuals Evan Chesler likely has professional access to. A relationship does not necessarily indicate a personal connection.

President & Chief Executive Officer at The New York Public Library

Relationship likelihood: Strong

Special Counsel at Cravath, Swaine & Moore LLP

Relationship likelihood: Strong

Founding Partner at Wachtell, Lipton, Rosen & Katz

Relationship likelihood: Strong

Co-Director of the Leadership Program on Law & Business at New York University - School of Law

Relationship likelihood: Strong

Partner at Cravath, Swaine & Moore LLP

Relationship likelihood: Strong

Partner at Cravath, Swaine & Moore LLP

Relationship likelihood: Strong

Director at American Law Institute

Relationship likelihood: Strong

Partner at Cravath, Swaine & Moore LLP

Relationship likelihood: Strong

Partner at Cravath, Swaine & Moore LLP

Relationship likelihood: Strong

Chair, Appellate & Supreme Court Litigation Practice at Wilmer Cutler Pickering Hale and Dorr LLP

Relationship likelihood: Strong

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Evan Chesler
Partner at Cravath, Swaine & Moore LLP
Education
JD, cum laude, Order of the Coif
Class of 1975

Founded in 1835, New York University School of Law has a record of academic excellence and national scholarly influence. One of the first law schools to admit women, it has been long committed to welcoming students of diverse backgrounds, people who had been discriminated against by many other institutions. Located on the University's campus in Greenwich Village, NYU Law has been a leader, and continues to be, in areas such as law and business, clinical education, public service, interdisciplinary colloquia and global studies.

MA in Russian Area Studies, summa cum laude
Class of 1973

Hunter College, located in the heart of bustling Manhattan, is the largest college in the City University of New York (CUNY) system. Founded in 1870, it is also one of the oldest public colleges in the country. Currently, over 22,000 students attend Hunter, pursuing both undergraduate and graduate degrees in more than 170 different programs of study. Hunter College is famous for the diversity of its student body, which is as diverse as New York City itself. For over 140 years, it has provided educational opportunities for women and minorities, and today, students from every walk of life and every corner of the world convene at Hunter in pursuit of the American Dream.

AB in History with Highest Honors
Class of 1970

Founded in 1831, New York University is now one of the largest private universities in the United States. Of the more than 3,000 colleges and universities in America, New York University is one of only 60 member institutions of the distinguished Association of American Universities. From a student body of 158 during NYU's very first semester, enrollment has grown to more than 40,000 students attending 18 schools and colleges at five major centers in Manhattan and in sites in Africa, Asia, Europe, and South America. Today, students come from every state in the union and from 133 foreign countries. The faculty, which initially consisted of fourteen professors and lecturers (among them artist and inventor Samuel F. B. Morse), now totals over 3,100 full-time members whose research and teaching encompasses the humanities, the sciences, and the social sciences; the law; medicine; business; education; the fine arts, studio art, and the performing and cinematic arts; music; social work; public administration; the ancient world; and continuing and professional studies. With more than 2,500 courses offered, the University awards more than 25 different degrees. Although overall the University is large, the individuals schools and colleges are small- to moderate-sized units—each with its own traditions, programs, and faculty – and there are many communities to be found within the NYU community based on interests, activities, and shared experiences. The center of NYU is its Washington Square campus in the heart of Greenwich Village. One of the city's most creative and energetic communities, the Village is a historic neighborhood that has attracted generations of writers, musicians, artists, and intellectuals. NYU, in keeping with its founder’s vision, is “in and of the city”: the University – which has no walls and no gates – is deeply intertwined with New York City, drawing inspiration from its vitality. In addition to its Manhattan locations, the University is also formally affiliated the Polytechnic Institute of NYU in Brooklyn, the second oldest school of engineering and technology in the country, and has research facilities, notably the Nelson Institute of Environmental Medicine, in Sterling Forest, near Tuxedo, New York. And NYU has established itself as the first global network university, with a comprehensive liberal arts campus in Abu Dhabi – the first to be operated abroad by a major U.S. research university – and other sites for study and research in Accra, Ghana; Berlin, Germany; Buenos Aires, Argentina; Florence, Italy; London, England; Madrid, Spain; Paris, France; Prague, the Czech Republic; Shanghai, China; and Tel Aviv, Israel, among other locations.

Memberships
Member
Current

American Bar Association provides legal services. It provides law school accreditation, continuing legal education, legal information and other services to assist legal professionals. The firm has members which include judges, court administrators, law professors, and non-practicing attorneys. The company was founded on August 21, 1878 and is headquartered in Chicago, IL.

Member
Current

The New York State Bar Association (NYSBA) is a voluntary bar association for the state of New York. NYSBA was founded in 1877 with the stated goal to cultivate the science of jurisprudence; to promote reform in the law; to facilitate the administration of justice, and to elevate the standards of integrity, honor, professional skill, and courtesy in the legal profession. Its first President was David B. Hill. Among the reforms in the legislation signed into law creating the association was the removal of the restrictions on the admission of women to the practice of law. In 1896, NYSBA proposed the first global means for settling disputes among nations, what is now called the Permanent Court of Arbitration in The Hague.

Member
Current

The Association of the Bar of the City of New York is a voluntary association of lawyers and law students. The organization was founded in 1870 and it is headquartered in New York, NY.

Career History
Partner
1976 - Current

Cravath, Swaine & Moore provides legal services in various industries such as: broadcasting, media and entertainment, consumer products, energy, financial institutions, healthcare, industrial and chemicals, professional services, real estate, retail, technology, telecommunications, and transportation. The company was founded in 1819 and is headquartered in New York, NY.

Clerk
Prior

United States District Court for the Southern District of New York (in case citations, S.D.N.Y.) is a federal district court. Appeals from the Southern District of New York are taken to the United States Court of Appeals for the Second Circuit (except for patent claims and claims against the U.S. government under the Tucker Act, which are appealed to the Federal Circuit). The Southern District is one of the most influential and active federal district courts in the United States, largely because of its jurisdiction over New York's major financial centers.

Adjunct Faculty Member
Prior

The history of the College of Arts and Science begins with the founding of the University by a number of prominent New Yorkers, led by Albert Gallatin, a member of Jefferson’s cabinet. Unlike other institutions at the time, it was to be nonsectarian and to produce a different sort of elite citizen, not born to privilege but set apart for leadership by talent and effort. To that end it provided a more practical education, what the 19th century called "Useful Knowledge." Thus, in addition to offering the standard classical curriculum, early NYU was also a center for science. Samuel F. B. Morse invented the telegraph while teaching art and design; John W. Draper invented modern photography; and the American Chemical Society was founded here. In the arts and culture, too, it can be argued that the College not only participated in, but also generated much of, the creative energy that has characterized Greenwich Village. The original University Building housed ateliers that were the forerunners of the current downtown art scene. And although Henry Wadsworth Longfellow was turned down for a teaching post, literature thrived, with University Building even featured in a novel by the eccentric Theodore Winthrop (1861). Finally, this neighborhood and this institution have had a long tradition of social and political activism from the Stonecutters Riot over the construction of the University’s first building in 1834 to the tragic Triangle Shirtwaist Factory fire in 1911, a major event in U.S. labor history that took place in what is now the Brown Building. From its earliest days, then, the College on Washington Square has been at the cutting edge of intellectual, cultural, and social developments. In 1895, however, NYU’s great chancellor, Henry MacCracken, decided to reserve Washington Square for the professional schools, which proliferated under his leadership, and to move University College to a beautiful campus in the Bronx- University Heights- designed by Stanford White. The College’s move to the Heights reflected MacCracken’s "Ivy" aspirations for the school and his successful effort to raise quality by attracting the best students nationally. Also relevant was the ascendant, nonurban collegiate ideal of a residential community, with fine teaching, extracurricular activities, fraternities, and intercollegiate athletics. A few years later an undergraduate presence was restored downtown with the opening of a Collegiate Division (1903), soon to become Washington Square College (1913). This school had a more diverse student body, opening its doors to women, recent immigrants, commuters, and professional students. For over 60 years, undergraduate liberal arts education at NYU took place in two locations-University College (and the Engineering School) at the Heights and the College on Washington Square, both offering excellent, but different, educational and social experiences. In the 1970s the College underwent yet another major transformation. In response to financial pressures, the Heights campus closed in 1973 and University College merged with Washington Square College. The new institution, which is now known simply as the College of Arts and Science, is the beneficiary of both traditions-the Heights’ residential and collegiate culture and the Square’s progressive urban focus. At that time, a decision was also made to build aggressively for quality-to recruit the very best faculty and students, to update and expand the physical plant, and to create distinguished programs both here and abroad. In recent years the College has become recognized as a national leader for its efforts to reinvent a liberal arts education for the 21st century. With a challenging liberal arts core, the College Core Curriculum, at the center of its curriculum, the College emphasizes student inquiry and research; offers unique opportunities for international and preprofessional study; and makes use of the city as a site for learning and service. A liberal arts education thus reconceived is not only personally enriching but also eminently practical in developing the skills and perspectives essential to assume a leadership role in the 21st century. As the new millennium proceeds, the College continues to build on its founders’ goal of providing "Useful Knowledge."

Boards & Committees
Co Chairman of the Board
Tenure Unconfirmed

Cravath, Swaine & Moore provides legal services in various industries such as: broadcasting, media and entertainment, consumer products, energy, financial institutions, healthcare, industrial and chemicals, professional services, real estate, retail, technology, telecommunications, and transportation. The company was founded in 1819 and is headquartered in New York, NY.

Member, Board of Overseers
1996 - Current

The history of the College of Arts and Science begins with the founding of the University by a number of prominent New Yorkers, led by Albert Gallatin, a member of Jefferson’s cabinet. Unlike other institutions at the time, it was to be nonsectarian and to produce a different sort of elite citizen, not born to privilege but set apart for leadership by talent and effort. To that end it provided a more practical education, what the 19th century called "Useful Knowledge." Thus, in addition to offering the standard classical curriculum, early NYU was also a center for science. Samuel F. B. Morse invented the telegraph while teaching art and design; John W. Draper invented modern photography; and the American Chemical Society was founded here. In the arts and culture, too, it can be argued that the College not only participated in, but also generated much of, the creative energy that has characterized Greenwich Village. The original University Building housed ateliers that were the forerunners of the current downtown art scene. And although Henry Wadsworth Longfellow was turned down for a teaching post, literature thrived, with University Building even featured in a novel by the eccentric Theodore Winthrop (1861). Finally, this neighborhood and this institution have had a long tradition of social and political activism from the Stonecutters Riot over the construction of the University’s first building in 1834 to the tragic Triangle Shirtwaist Factory fire in 1911, a major event in U.S. labor history that took place in what is now the Brown Building. From its earliest days, then, the College on Washington Square has been at the cutting edge of intellectual, cultural, and social developments. In 1895, however, NYU’s great chancellor, Henry MacCracken, decided to reserve Washington Square for the professional schools, which proliferated under his leadership, and to move University College to a beautiful campus in the Bronx- University Heights- designed by Stanford White. The College’s move to the Heights reflected MacCracken’s "Ivy" aspirations for the school and his successful effort to raise quality by attracting the best students nationally. Also relevant was the ascendant, nonurban collegiate ideal of a residential community, with fine teaching, extracurricular activities, fraternities, and intercollegiate athletics. A few years later an undergraduate presence was restored downtown with the opening of a Collegiate Division (1903), soon to become Washington Square College (1913). This school had a more diverse student body, opening its doors to women, recent immigrants, commuters, and professional students. For over 60 years, undergraduate liberal arts education at NYU took place in two locations-University College (and the Engineering School) at the Heights and the College on Washington Square, both offering excellent, but different, educational and social experiences. In the 1970s the College underwent yet another major transformation. In response to financial pressures, the Heights campus closed in 1973 and University College merged with Washington Square College. The new institution, which is now known simply as the College of Arts and Science, is the beneficiary of both traditions-the Heights’ residential and collegiate culture and the Square’s progressive urban focus. At that time, a decision was also made to build aggressively for quality-to recruit the very best faculty and students, to update and expand the physical plant, and to create distinguished programs both here and abroad. In recent years the College has become recognized as a national leader for its efforts to reinvent a liberal arts education for the 21st century. With a challenging liberal arts core, the College Core Curriculum, at the center of its curriculum, the College emphasizes student inquiry and research; offers unique opportunities for international and preprofessional study; and makes use of the city as a site for learning and service. A liberal arts education thus reconceived is not only personally enriching but also eminently practical in developing the skills and perspectives essential to assume a leadership role in the 21st century. As the new millennium proceeds, the College continues to build on its founders’ goal of providing "Useful Knowledge."

President, Board of Directors
1996 - Current

The Dwight D. Opperman Institute of Judicial Administration (IJA) was founded at New York University School of Law in 1952 and was one of the first organizations committed to improving the administration of justice in the federal and state courts.

Chairman, Board of Trustees
Current

The New York Public Library provides library services. It uses its available resources in a program of collecting, cataloging, and conserving books and other materials, and providing ready access directly to individual library users and to users elsewhere through cooperating libraries and library networks. The company was founded in 1895 and is headquartered in New York, NY.

Non-Profit Donations & Grants

Learn how non-profit organizations benefit from RelSci
$250K - $500K
2014

The New York Public Library provides library services. It uses its available resources in a program of collecting, cataloging, and conserving books and other materials, and providing ready access directly to individual library users and to users elsewhere through cooperating libraries and library networks. The company was founded in 1895 and is headquartered in New York, NY.

$5,000 - $10K
2013

In 1979, CPR started this legacy by being the first to bring together Corporate Counsel and their firms to find ways to lower the cost of litigation. Since that time, CPR has changed the way the world resolves conflict by being the first to develop an ADR Pledge. Today, this Pledge obliges over 4,000 operating companies and 1,500 law firms to explore alternative dispute resolution options before pursuing litigation. CPR is once again challenging the way the world resolves conflict by introducing the 21st Century Corporate ADR Pledge. This new Pledge will systemically change the way global business and their leaders resolve complex commercial disputes. CPR’s membership comprises an elite group of ADR trailblazers, including executives and legal counsel from the world’s most successful companies and global law firms, government officials, retired judges, highly-experienced neutrals, and leading academics.

$25K - $50K
2013

The New York Public Library provides library services. It uses its available resources in a program of collecting, cataloging, and conserving books and other materials, and providing ready access directly to individual library users and to users elsewhere through cooperating libraries and library networks. The company was founded in 1895 and is headquartered in New York, NY.

Political Donations
$5,000
2006
$2,100
2005

Former Governor of Indiana

$500
1983

Former Vice President at Office of the Vice President Under Jimmy Carter

Transactions
Details Hidden

Cerberus Capital Management LP purchases Avon Products, Inc. /North America Bus from Avon Products, Inc. resulting in a new company New Avon LLC

Details Hidden

Merrill Lynch Global Private Equity, Inc., HCA, Inc. /Private Group, Kohlberg Kravis Roberts & Co. LP purchase HCA, Inc.

Awards & Honors
2017
Best Lawyers - Best Lawyers in America, Patent Litigation
2017
Best Lawyers - Best Lawyers in America, Commercial Litigation
2017
Chambers Global - World’s Leading Lawyers for Business, Competition/Antitrust
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